Female Viagra

At present there is no such thing as a ‘female Viagra’, at least not yet. But with studies saying that over 43% of women suffer from sexual dysfunction, many large pharmaceutical and drug companies are now in a race to develop a female Viagra for women. However developing this female Viagra is not as simple as it seems.

According to most research, female sexual dysfunction is most often characterized by a lack of sexual desire or arousal. Some studies report that over a third of women complain that a lack of desire is one of the main reasons for them not being sexually stimulated.

Researchers believe that a woman’s lack of sexual interest is often tied in with the kind of relationships they share with their partners. In women lack of sexual interest can also be triggered by emotional issues such as family problems, illness, death, financial problems, prior or current emotional/physical abuse, fatigue and or depression. In women sexual dysfunction is more psychological than physical.

But physical illness can also contribute to women’s sexual problems such as heart problems, cancer, diabetes, thyroid disorders, neurological illnesses and autoimmune diseases. Prescription medication, anti-depressants, over-the-counter medications and drug abuse can all lead to women lack sexual interest.

Though there is currently no FDA approved treatments for sexual impotence in women, there are plenty of alternatives that are out there that have not been approved. Research is also being conducted by big pharmaceutical giants like Pfizer and P&G, but more investigations still need to be explored.

Currently for women who have had a hysterectomy or have had their ovaries removed, doctors now prescribed testosterone to improve the female sexual drive.

The failure of P&G’s testosterone patch Intrinsa shows that many big companies are now moving fast to find a treatment for sexual dysfunction in women with many promising drug. Some of the newly developing treatments include prostaglandin (which is already approved for men), apomorphine and phentolamine, all of which are under clinical trials. Research has also shown that with exercise, counseling and vaginal lubricants, many women have felt their sex drive increase.

Listed below are some unapproved and herbal treatments being used to treat impotence and sexual dysfunction in women: L-arginine amino acid cream is currently used by athletes to promote muscle development. In women, this cream is being used to increase blood flow to the clitoris to encourage sexual desire.

DHEA or Dehydroepiandrosterone is a male hormone that is produced by the adrenal gland and ovaries in the body, which are then converted into testosterone and estrogen in men and women respectively. Recent studies show that women taking DHEA daily have a significantly increased sex drive. Unfortunately, this treatment also has serious side effects like the risk of a heart attack increases and along with the risk for developing breast cancer increase. Women also tend to develop more facial hair under this therapy.

Testosterone Therapy is being used by doctors for women who have had hysterectomies or oophorectomies. The testosterone here is given in small doses. A promising treatment, many women under its clinical trails claim improved sexual functioning.

Herbal creams and tablets such as Vigorelle, estraVil and Avlimil are being widely touted by their manufacturers as the ‘female Viagra’, however these products are not FDA approved and so they have no real quality standards. Claimed to be made from botanical herbs and extracts such as Red raspberry leaf, Organic Damiana Leaf and Ginger root, these products should be approached with extreme caution.